We are living in exciting times. The Signposts point to Jesus soon return.

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

To Stave Off Decline, Churches Attract New Members With Beer

Prophecy Sign:  Growing apostasy in the church


So this is what passes as "church" today in some minds; Beer swilling crowds of bar-hoppers singing good old fashioned hymns while listening to a tattooed, foul mouthed homosexual edifying female Pastor.  And you wonder why we think the church has gone off the rails in many places and has become the apostate church of the last days? A perfect passage of scripture seems to best describe this type of "Christian" church.

'These people honor me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me. They worship me in vain; their teachings are merely human rules.' Matthew 15:8-9 NIV

To Stave Off Decline, Churches Attract New Members With Beer
With mainline religious congregations dwindling across America, a scattering of churches is trying to attract new members by creating a different sort of Christian community. They are gathering around craft beer. Some church groups are brewing it themselves, while others are bring the Holy Mysteries to a taproom. The result is not sloshed congregants; rather, it's an exploratory approach to do church differently. Leah Stanfield stands at a microphone across the room from the beer taps and reads this evening's gospel message. She's a 28-year-old leasing agent who's been coming to Church-in-a-Pub here in Fort Worth, Tex., for a year, and occasionally leads worship. "I find the love, I find the support, I find the non-judgmental eyes when I come here," she says. "And I find friends that love God, love craft beer."
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/11/03/242301642/to-stave-off-decline-churches-attract-new-members-with-beer

Bolz-Weber’s liberal, foulmouthed articulation of Christianity speaks to fed-up believers
Nadia Bolz-Weber bounds into the University United Methodist Church sanctuary like a superhero from Planet Alternative Christian. Her 6-foot-1 frame is plastered with tattoos, her arms are sculpted by competitive weightlifting and, to show it all off, this pastor is wearing a tight tank top and jeans.
In her body and her theology, Bolz-Weber represents a new, muscular form of liberal Christianity, one that merges the passion and life-changing fervor of evangelicalism with the commitment to inclusiveness and social justice of mainline Protestantism. She’s a tatted-up, foul-mouthed champion to people sick of being belittled as not Christian enough for the right or too Jesus-y for the left. “You show us all your dirty laundry! It’s all out there!” the Rev. John Elford of the University United Methodist Church booms, as if he is introducing a rock star, leading the cheering crowd into an impassioned round of hymn-singing. Bolz-Weber springs onstage to do a reading from her book, but first she addresses the language that’s about to be unleashed on the pulpit: “I don’t think church leaders should pretend to be something they’re not.”


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